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Tech Tips

HTTP/1.1 404 Object Not Found Server: Microsoft-IIS/5.0 Date: Tue, 02 Jun 2009 13:47:23 GMT Cluster-Server: WEB1 P3P: CP="NOI ADMa OUR STP" X-Powered-By: ASP.NET Connection: close Content-Type: text/html

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HTTP/1.1 404 Object Not Found Server: Microsoft-IIS/5.0 Date: Tue, 02 Jun 2009 13:47:23 GMT Cluster-Server: WEB1 P3P: CP="NOI ADMa OUR STP" X-Powered-By: ASP.NET Connection: close Content-Type: text/html

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    PlanetQuake | Features | Tech Tips | 5-20-2000
   

Tech Tips
This is where your gaming and hardware needs are met. Be all that you can be or get out of the game! This won't be a forum for techno-geeks to find more ways to impress their non-technical friends, it's for plain folk who need help to better their gaming experience. But don't blame us if you blow your machine sky high; we're offering tips, not the Bible on computers. The mailbag is alive and well - send in those questions to TechTips.
by Love2Play


Linux
Server Networking

Here we are, lucky again to have Tiberian leading the way in our quest for Linux knowledge. Here he puts us in touch with our inner....well, with the Internet and the network.  So once again, take notes or hook up the printer!

Also, let me take this opportunity to congratulate Tiberian. Muppet of our hosted site Linux has signed on Tiberian as a member of the staff there. We are proud of Tiberian and are excited that he and Muppet will be bringing PlanetQuake the best dern Linux site in all of Quakedom! So get over there and see what they've got!

Linux Server
By Joshua "Tiberian" Knarr

Hello again, and welcome to Tubby Tibs Fine Dining. Today on the menu, we have bronto-TCP/IP, pizza al la Console, and Fried Daemon Chips for the kids. Sit down, pull up a chair, sedate the kids, and watch some MST3K as we get into the Wonderful World of Linux Networking!

Scott's Internet safety note: Also, you should make a minor point that you should NEVER EVER do anything other than system administration chores as root. Even running a Quake server is best done as a normal user. There's just too much of a risk of nuking something, or of getting something compromised because one of your binaries was running as root. :)

Josh's Internet safety note: Don't IRC from root. It's bad. Take my advice at face value, I don't want to start another crop of script kiddies due to something I include here. :)

Here it is, take a good look!

You've probably already been screwing around in Linux and found the handily little kppp, right? If not, open up your KDE menu and click on "kppp" (probably somewhere under "internet"). For those not running KDE, type "kppp" on the console, or, if your UI supports reading the KDE menus, you can click on it from in there. If you've got a modem, this is your ticket to muck and mayhem on the internet. You'll also want to get a copy of Licq (ICQ is probably included in most distributions, but Licq is my personal favorite). It can be found on The Licq Homepage (and requires QT 2.0.x).

How do you know what kind of broadband connection you have? Well, if you connect to your ISP and you get "flashy computers" in your clock tray, then you most likely are running WINPoET. See the ADSL section. If you turn your computer on and have a DIFFERENT IP each time, then you are using DHCP. Follow the DHCPCD instructions. And if you are a lucky bastard and are always on and always have the same IP, you would just use "ifconfig eth0 [assigned ipaddress]" and you would be right as rain.

If you have @Home, or a comparable cable or ADSL that offers static IPs, then you know that you have two or three IP addresses to use for your service. It's not as simple as just plugging those IPs in, you also need your DNS servers. DNS servers are what your computer talks to in order to get the IPs for servers that you request. You can either call up your ISP or find out with a "whois" as to what your DNS servers are.

(I'm cheating, I am already online. You'll have to do this from someone else's computer. I am pretty sure that Windows has a whois command in the later versions. If not, we can call them on the phone.)

BigIron:~# whois home.com
[rs.internic.net]
Whois Server Version 1.1
Domain names in the .com, .net, and .org domains can now be registered
with many different competing registrars. Go to http://www.internic.net
for detailed information.
Domain Name: HOME.COM
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, INC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: www.networksolutions.com
Name Server: NS2.HOME.NET
Name Server: NS1.HOME.NET
Updated Date: 16-dec-1999
>>> Last update of whois database: Mon, 15 May 00 04:07:59 EDT <<<
The Registry database contains ONLY .COM, .NET, .ORG, .EDU domains and
Registrars.

Whoohoo! See the entry for "Name Server"? We want both of those. Write them down!

Ping that nameserver! cyrex200:~$ ping ns2.home.net PING ns2.home.net (24.2.0.27): 56 data bytes 64 bytes from 24.2.0.27: icmp_seq=0 ttl=240 time=73.3 ms 64 bytes from 24.2.0.27: icmp_seq=1 ttl=240 time=64.7 ms

--- ns2.home.net ping statistics --- 2 packets transmitted, 2 packets received, 0% packet loss round-trip min/avg/max = 64.7/69.0/73.3 ms

Hit ^c when you see the part about "64 bytes from.....". See that IP address? Write that down! Do it agian for the other server.

Next, pop open /etc/resolv.conf.

The proper format for resolv.conf is "nameserver <ipaddress>" and following that line, "secondary <ipaddress>" with one blank line at the end of the file. Your resolv.conf should look like:

nameserver 24.2.0.27 
secondary 24.0.0.27

(Notice the blank line.) It doesn't really matter which order you put the servers in. Linux will keep going down the list if a server is down. If all the servers are down, then your ISP is probably kaput, so you probably shouldn't worry about getting online anyway.

The common problem a lot of people run into is that your ISP won't give you a nameserver or finds out that you are running Linux and curtly denies any further help. Call them back, and tell them you are running a Macintosh. Macs need nameservers to connect, so the user has to enter them manually. Mac users aren't a threat! Be proud to be an apple. (Wear the penguin under the tie). After you ask them for the nameservers and tell them how nice it is to use the internet and compliment their good service, then you can plug them into your resolv.conf. If they STILL won't surrender the nameservers and/or don't support Mac, you might want to find a new ISP. As usual, if you are still hurting after this breakneck speed run through, try looking things up on The Linux Documentation Project under the mini-how-to section.


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